Category Archives: Molinism

A Theologically Indubitable Subjunctive Counterfactual

The issue of Molinism has continued to occupy much of my time in reflection of late, and I realized that all Christians do believe in at least one subjunctive counterfactual of libertarian free will, or at least nearly all Christians … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Molinism, Theology | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Molinism and the Accidents of Salvation

Even if there is not a best of all logically possible worlds, I think the Molinist will want to insist that there is either a best of all logically feasible worlds (in light of which counterfactuals obtain) or a class … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Molinism, Philosophical Theology, Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, Theology | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Molinism and Sovereignty

The Christian who believes that God has middle knowledge is typically concerned to secure the belief that God is Sovereign in the sense that nothing whatever is out of God’s providential control and direction. God ordains what we will freely … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Molinism, Philosophical Theology, Philosophy of Religion, Theology | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Grounding Molinist-type counterfactuals?

Here’s an interesting thought I just had: what if instances of acting libertarian-freely not only determine the truth value of what libertarian-free subject S chooses actually (A), but also grounds what S would have done counterfactually? So, when S libertarian … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Molinism, Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, Theology | 26 Comments

Molinism and Prophecy

Today I had to give a presentation of Luis de Molina’s doctrine of middle knowledge for a philosophy class, and I also received a comment on my blog which invited me to think more deeply about Molinism. The question I … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Molinism, Philosophical Theology, Philosophy of Religion | Leave a comment

Acts of understanding: Elucidating/Negating the previous post

I may have been overambitious in my previous post, and made too much out of too little (this came to me upon critical reflection). My mistake was that I suggested that the difference between certain ‘modes’ of God’s understanding, classically … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Free Will, Modality, Molinism, Philosophical Theology, Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, Theology | Leave a comment

Maximally Specific Synthetic Propositions

I have already argued that logically possible worlds ought not to be regarded as maximally consistent sets of propositions because it has been demonstrated that the ‘set of all true propositions‘ does not exist. Instead, therefore, we should speak about … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Modality, Molinism, Philosophical Theology, Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, Philosophy of Time, Theology | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

LEM and subjunctive counterfactual conditionals of creaturely freedom

While the law of non-contradiction says that no proposition can be both true and false in the same instance and in the same sense, the law of excluded middle says something slightly different. The law of excluded middle (LEM) says … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Molinism, Theology | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Deflationary theory of semantics and the PSR

The Principle of Sufficient Reason can be construed as the principle which states that for any fact having the property of being true or false (contingently), there is some corresponding reason which explains why the fact should have that property. … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Free Will, Modality, Molinism, Theology | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Middle Knowledge and Theology of Revelation

I want to suspend my reservations about the doctrine of middle knowledge for the moment in order to explore two interesting (possibly advantageous) consequences for our theology of Revelation which it may have. First of all, we may be able … Continue reading

Posted in Molinism, Philosophical Theology, Theology, Trinitarianism | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment