Category Archives: Hagiography

The Christmas Magi

There are quite a few myths about the Bible out there, such as that Eve ate an apple, or that the Magi came to Christ at the time of his birth. In this post, I thought, for Christmas, I’d just … Continue reading

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How historical is Job?

It seems clear to me that the book of Job is written not in the style of a historical document, but a narrated play. Thus, I had agreed with exegetes like Martin Luther that the book of Job was not … Continue reading

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What does Manichean Iconography tell us about Manichean doctrine?

G.K. Chesterton, with his usual wit, candor and insight, said in Orthodoxy, which I read over this past summer, the following: Even when I thought, with most other well-informed, though unscholarly, people, that Buddhism and Christianity were alike, there was one thing … Continue reading

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A thought experiment about the Sacrament of Ordination

I found myself recently in a discussion where I defended the Catholic Church’s position that there must be (of necessity) a male only priesthood. I explained the logic of this using theology of the body, liturgy, cosmological implications for Christian … Continue reading

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The Monastic fascination with the Desert

It is well noted in the study of Hagiography, as well as general Patristic studies, that for earlier Christians the desert was recognized as the domain of the Devil; where demons reside. For instance, consider the conviction of the desert … Continue reading

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Saint Guinefort

This is a really strange and great story which is worth telling. I had to read this for my Hagiography class recently, and I think it is a fascinating story, written as a criticism (in part) of the cult of … Continue reading

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