Category Archives: Philosophy of Mind

Minds and Brains: Justification for Immaterialism about the Mind

I have made this point a few times in various discussions, but I’d like to make it here again. Often the Naturalist will argue that we have never observed minds without brains. For every mind we observe, we observe a … Continue reading

Posted in Empiricism, Epistemology, Naturalism, Philosophy, Philosophy of Mind | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Do I believe in my-self?

Suppose somebody says “I think that personal identity is an illusion”. Granted, if they are Naturalists they might think that they must adopt such a commitment, since it is impossible for aggregates of matter to be ‘about’ other things, and … Continue reading

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Aristotle – on whether the soul can survive death

Although Aristotle seems to end his investigation of the soul with the conclusion that men do not have individual souls in the same way as they have individual bodies (each individual man being an individuated substance by reason of being … Continue reading

Posted in Apologetics, Free Will, Metaphysics, Philosophical Theology, Philosophy, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Religion, Rationalism | Tagged , | 3 Comments

James Cornman and the Identity of Indiscernibles

James Cornman was a defender of non-reductive materialism when it came to the issue of mind-brain interaction. In other words his analysis of what the ‘mind’ was, was in the end that it was identical with the brain (i.e., material). … Continue reading

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Mind-Body interaction: Metaphysical Concretism

One argument against the position that the mind can act causally on the body, and the body also act causally on the mind (two-way interaction), is simply the point that the mind and the body are wholly different kinds of … Continue reading

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