Category Archives: Philosophical Theology

God’s Providence over history and the causal relations of the disjuncts of disjunctive causes

God is in control of world history. However, world history seems to be comprised of one creature’s libertarian free will after another, none of which are directly in God’s control (i.e., Molinism is false, and even if God is in … Continue reading

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Does Evil Make a World Better?

Plantinga has argued publicly that perhaps one of the reasons God has for permitting evils like the holocaust, or the social experiment of Marxist communism, or any other evils you might think of, is because of the intrinsic goodness of … Continue reading

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Getting from one to all superlative attributes from Simplicity?

Suppose that: 1. If God exists, then God is metaphysically simple. Now, the doctrine of divine simplicity implies that God’s nature is simple (is one thing, rather than a complex of things), and thus that each of the superlative attributes … Continue reading

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Incommensurable good of creation and not-creation

I take it that, all things being equal, were two worlds W1 and W2 feasible for God to create, and W1 involved either more people going to heaven or fewer people going to Hell, where the number of people in … Continue reading

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Platonism’ Formal Family Tree

Platonists say that Platonic Forms are beings which exist. I do not think they do exist (and I don’t even think they are ‘beings’, contra the neo-meingonian). However, in thinking about Platonism, which has occupied me lately, it seems to … Continue reading

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Pure Undifferentiated Substances?

Recently I was confronted, in the midst of a discussion about Transubstantiation, with the idea that a commitment to substance realism seems to entail a commitment to the reality or possibility of a pure undifferentiated substance. I responded in the … Continue reading

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Properly Basic Inferences

Recently I suggested that belief in God might be properly basic in two ways, either by being grounding in something like a sensus divinitatis, or by being entailed by some other properly basic belief. This is, in retrospect, obviously a mistake. … Continue reading

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Universal Sanction and belief in the reality of the past

Some philosophers suggest that a criteria for properly basic beliefs is required of those who posit proper basicality of beliefs. The criteria which is widely being either adopted or at least talked about is the criteria of universal sanction. In … Continue reading

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Is God Concrete?

I got caught a few days ago in a paradox which arose from a combination of philosophical statements I am used to making. I argued that the definition of an abstract object was of a thing which exists or subsists, … Continue reading

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The Difference between Physical and Temporal Antecedence

My purpose in this post is simple; I want to demonstrate that physical antecedence is not coextensive with temporal antecedence and vice versa. You can have one without the other. This reflection leads to a very weak argument against the … Continue reading

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